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"That Next Drink May Kill You" And Other Stories

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Unless you've been living under a rock, you've seen the headlines: "No amount of alcohol is good for your overall health, global study says," "Alcohol was responsible for nearly 3 million deaths in 2016, study says," "Health risks of alcohol outweigh benefits, study says."

The study was published in The Lancet. You've heard of The Lancet, right? Lots of medical stories start out there.

Read down a bit and you discover that the study was funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. The mission of the Gates foundation is to "help all people lead healthy, productive lives." There's nothing wrong with that.

When I see stories like this, especially when alcohol is involved, I like to skip the lurid conclusions and jump to things like who paid for the study and, most of all, what was their methodology?

The study used data from the 2016 Global Burden of Disease report, which captured information on premature death and disability from ov…

Riverside, the Chicago Portage, and Quincy Street Distillery

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Chicago is laid out on a grid, as are most of its suburbs. But look at a map of the western burbs and Riverside stands out, a grid without corners. Instead of straight lines, Riverside�s streets are gently curved, like the Des Plaines River that borders the town on the south and west, and gives it its name.

Riverside was an early example of a planned community, designed in 1869 by Calvert Vaux and Frederick Law Olmsted, who most famously designed New York�s Central Park. It was intended as a suburb, connected by commuter rail to Chicago's downtown. Today most of the town is a National Historic District.

One of the very few straight streets in Riverside is Quincy, where you will find Quincy Street Distillery, a small artisan distiller near an art glass studio and the local arts center. Quincy Street gives tours and does tastings, by appointment, four days a week.

Quincy Street makes a large variety of whiskeys, gins, and other spirits.

A visit to a small distillery can be pretty quick,…

MGP Reduces Minimum Order for Custom Mash Bills

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MGP announced today that it has reduced its minimum order for spirits made from proprietary mash bills to 250 barrels from the previous 1,000-barrel requirement, said MGP Vice President of Alcohol Sales and Marketing David Dykstra.

In addition to lowering the minimum order, MGP will allow customers to 'pool' orders with other producers to fulfill the 250-barrel requirement.

MGP also offers a customized barrel entry proof, and the option to use either new or used barrels. Aging in an MGP rack house is also available.

�We�re full-service and fully committed to partnerships that benefit our customers of all sizes,� Dykstra said.

This change would seem to indicate that the contract distilling marketplace is becoming more competitive and MGP is no longer the only game in town.

Some Perspective on the Barton Warehouse Collapse

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Two weeks ago, we told you about the partial collapse of Warehouse 30 at the Barton 1792 Distillery in Bardstown, Kentucky. Yesterday, not surprisingly, the rest of it came down. The photographs and videos are certainly dramatic, approximately 18,000 barrels of whiskey, each one holding 53 gallons and weighing 500 pounds, in a massive pile, with pieces of the roof and other debris scattered about.

No one was injured in either collapse.

The story is all over social media and many people are blowing it way out of proportion. Obviously, it is a bad accident, but it doesn't imperil Sazerac, the distillery's owner, nor will it have a significant impact on the industry as a whole. It is a drop in the bucket. There are currently 6,657,063 barrels of whiskey aging in Kentucky. The barrels affected in this incident represent about 1/3 of 1% of that total, and that's just in Kentucky. There are a few million more aging in Tennessee, Indiana, and other states.

Although they are rare, ev…

In Bourbon Country, Fall Begins Today

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No, the leaves haven't changed and the thermometer tells a different story, but July 1 is the first day of the fall distilling season in America's whiskey distilleries.

Division of the year into two distilling seasons was codified in the Bottled in Bond Act of 1897 and later incorporated into the Federal Standards of Identity for Distilled Spirits as Subpart B, Sec. 5.11 'Meaning of terms.'

The significance of this rule is shown in the photograph. For a distilled spirit to be labeled 'bonded' or 'bottled-in-bond' it must, among other things, have been entirely distilled within a single distilling season, either spring (1/1 - 6/30) or fall (7/1 - 12/31) of a given year. Although the law no longer requires disclosure of the distilling season on the label, it still obliges producers to adhere to that limitation.

Designating the two seasons as 'spring' and 'fall,' rather than in some other way, has even deeper roots. Traditionally, distilling w…

The Rest of the Sourced Whiskey Story

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A few weeks ago, NBC News posted a story and video with the headline "Behind the misleading claims fueling America's bourbon boom." They did a good job with it. It was well told and accurate, despite the overheated headline.

Stories about whiskey sourcing appear from time to time and that's good too. It is an aspect of the industry most people don't understand, and there are shady operators out there who exploit that ignorance.

But there are a few parts of this story most journalists miss.

(1) Sourced whiskey is nothing new.

(2) Whiskey sourcing is not inherently sinister.

(3) It's not all coming from MGP.

First, some history. It took a long time for distilled spirits to become an industry in the United States. Distilleries, like most things, were local. You bought your whiskey or other spirit directly from the person who made it, or from a local retailer who did. It was only around the middle of the 19th century that it became an industry. The Coffey still made it…

Partial Warehouse Collapse at Barton 1792

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At about 11AM EDT this morning, without warning, a whiskey aging warehouse at the Barton 1792 Distillery in Bardstown partially collapsed. No one was injured but about 9,000 barrels are affected, according to Nelson County Emergency Management spokesman Milt Spalding. Although the visible barrels appear remarkably intact, they may be leaking. So far, according to officials, water in the nearby Beech Fork River has not been impacted.

The building, which is about 60 years old, was being repaired. Bardstown Fire Chief Billy Mattingly said the part still standing is very unstable and may collapse as well. The warehouse held a total of 20,000 barrels.

There is no way to say yet how many barrels were lost. Intact barrels, still full, can be salvaged. Even so, the financial cost surely will be in the millions, not just from lost whiskey but also the cost of replacing the building. New warehouses cost about $2 million each. As for the whiskey, the value of a barrel will vary according to its ag…